The Infectious Myth On “The Infectious Myth” host David Crowe will examine the questionable or outright false paradigms that infect our society.

September 25, 2018  

Andrea Werhun is co-creator of the photo book, “Modern Whore: A Memoir”, that describes her two years as an escort, providing sexual services to men. She does not portray herself as a victim, but as someone who enjoyed her time. This is an interesting discussion about whether society can accept sex work as something that will never go away, and whether it should be treated like any other business, with society protecting both the providers and purchasers of sexual services.
For more information on Andrea, see: http://www.andreawerhun.com

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September 18, 2018  

Tara Marshall is a woman with autism who was blocked by people who might be called neurodiversity extremists because she treats her condition, quite successfully, but not completely, with diet. Extremists claim that autism is simply a different way of thinking, and not an illness. This makes no sense if you have ever seen a video of a child with severe autism, perhaps an adult in body who lost the ability to speak, and even bowel control early in their life. While some mild autism might be seen as a gift, despite how much parents love their severely autistic children, many wish that the regression had never happened, and would do anything to mitigate or reverse the symptoms. David and Tara talk about these complexities, and the rejection of dogmatism.

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September 12, 2018  

It might seem strange to revisit the Milan Plague of 1629-1632 but David asks questions that may never have been asked before: Why was the illnesses thought to be infectious in the 1600s? Did those who wrote a report afterwards have any evidence for the infectious theory? Why do we still think it is infectious when we probably would not believe anything else claimed by writers of that age. You can read the 1648 report (in Italian) here: http://theinfectiousmyth.com/ReportOnMilanEpidemic-1648-Tadino.pdf

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