The Infectious Myth On “The Infectious Myth” host David Crowe will examine the questionable or outright false paradigms that infect our society.

July 19, 2017  
In Episode 148, David Crowe speaks with David Smith of the UK charities Genital Autonomy and 15 Square. The conversation covers male genital mutilation (circumcision), female genital mutilation (FGM) and transgender changes of minors. They cover the reasons why circumcision still exists and why it is so much less common in the UK than in the US. They discuss the purpose of the foreskin and  what harms occur from its removal. Circumcision is contrasted with FGM, where the autonomy of the child is protected against an irreversible operation. With transgender and intersex minors, the issue is whether doctors and parents have the right to perform surgery on a child, even if the minor child agrees, due to the possibility of them changing their mind, but not of reversing the surgery. They also discuss how adult men can deal with phimosis (overly tight foreskin) and the ability to recover some of the foreskin through stretching.
 
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July 11, 2017  
When Chaneya Kelly was eight she stood up in court and said her father had sexually assaulted her. He was sentenced to 20-40 years, almost 20 years ago. Later she said she was bullied by her mother, police and prosecutors, as well as promised a special present, if she testified that she was abused. In 2012, the justice system established a commission to review her father’s case, but it told Chaneya she is lying now, and was telling the truth when she was eight. But she is not giving up.
 
For further information see a 2013 New York Magazine article: http://nymag.com/news/features/chaneya-kelly-2014-1/index6.html#print
 
If you are convinced of Daryl Kelly’s innocence (or at least think he should get a second hearing), you can sign his daughter's petition: https://www.change.org/p/andrew-cuomo-innocentdad-the-fight-to-free-daryl-kelly-sr
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June 20, 2017  
David Crowe speaks with Eric Merola about two conflicts between the medical establishment and non-mainstream therapies. The first is the latest battle in the long-running struggle of Dr. Stanislaw Burzyski in Houston, Texas, to be allowed to use his non-toxic anti-cancer therapies called anti-neoplastons. This time the Texas Medical Board once more tried to shut him down (listen to find out what happened). Later in the program they switch to talking about Eric’s latest film about stem cell therapy. This is particularly controversial because some of the stem cells come from abortions. Is it worth going to Mexico or the Ukraine to get this therapy?
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June 6, 2017  

In 2013 Joe and Charlotte’s baby Jaden suddenly collapsed. The parents called 9-1-1 but almost immediately doctors suspected child abuse. Despite a number of medical experts testifying that Jaden had a genetic or nutritional defect that caused weak bones and other health problems, Joe was convicted of child abuse and sentenced to 15 years, the minimum the judge could give him. David talks with his wife, Charlotte, who has not only lost her husband, but has completely lost Jaden (who recovered from the medical episode, whatever it’s cause) and has only part-time access to her other two children.  And she lost her job and her home. But still will never stop fighting to put her family back together again.

For more information see the family’s facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Justice-for-Joe-1085928654868950/

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May 30, 2017  

Marissa Alexander, a licensed gun owner, fired a warning shot at her estranged husband when he had her cornered in her own garage. The shot worked. He left, and neither of them was harmed. But she was charged and sentenced to 20 years. Defenses of self-defense didn’t work, not even invoking Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law. Public pressure eventually persuaded the prosecutor to agree to 3 years time served. What role did being black play? And the fact that this case played out at the time of the Trayvon Martin shooting? Marissa plans to use her experience of the US justice system, earned during 3 years in jail, to help others. through a non-profit that she has founded, the Marissa Alexander Justice Project:
https://marissaalexander.org

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May 23, 2017  
Judy Mikovits is a PhD scientist who was worked for government and drug companies studying viruses. She crossed some powerful people and ended up in jail for mysterious reasons. Did this have something with her persistence in saying that a virus might be involved in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Autism? But, unlike most virologists, she also believes that toxins play a large role. For example, a large outbreak of CFS at a Los Angeles hospital in the 1930s – only among staff – might have been due to the fact that they were being experimented on my the experimental Brodie polio vaccine. If virology confuses you, this discussion might make clarify some things.:
Judy Mikovits is author, along with Kent Heckenlively, of the new book, “Plague”. Find out more at: http://tmarcinc.org
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May 16, 2017  
David talks with Michael Ableman, a long time organic farmer and the founder of Sole Food Farms, that operates in vacant lots in the terribly poor downtown eastside of Vancouver. The farm not only cultivates many tons of vegetables and fruit, but also people. Many of the workers are homeless drug addicts who often find new meaning in their life through contact with the soil, and by bringing food to life. This is neither a normal, profit-making business, nor is it a charity. It is a working farm. But how does this work with people who might be picking peas one day and relapsing the next? A fascinating discussion that covers the challenges of urban agriculture to how our society produces such dramatic economic differences and can both produce hope and despair.
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May 9, 2017  
In episode 141 David talks with Brian Friedman, a New Orleans journalist, in his quest to find out whether Meredith McIver, the woman who took the blame for the plagiarism of Michelle Obama in Melania Trump’s RNC speech, is real. She has rarely been heard from. The last time was 10 years ago when Donald Trump blamed errors in two of his books on the woman he called his ghost writer. Friedman is not just concerned about whether the Trumps have an imaginary friend to blame things on, but also how compliant the mainstream media has been in accepting the story of the invisible woman, without verifying it, even though clues to her existence mean that for a news organization it would not be difficult to find her if she’s out there. It’s an interesting discussion about how we can distinguish truth from fiction. Because in this case it is not clear that we can.
 
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May 2, 2017  

David talks with James Trainum, a former Washington DC police detective about false confessions. Apart from studying them, he admits that once he obtained a false confession in a high profile case, so he understands just how easy it is for a policeman to fall into this trap. Apart from describing how false confessions can be obtained without any physical abuse of a suspect, he also describes how they can be avoided, such as by ending the use of the Reid technique and moving to the PEACE technique, developed by the British police after a raft of false confessions. Trainum is author of, “How the Police Generate False Confessions”: https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442244658/How-the-Police-Generate-False-Confessions-An-Inside-Look-at-the-Interrogation-Room

- David

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April 25, 2017  
David discusses bail reform with John Raphling. Even though his new report covers only California, his findings have applicability to all of the USA. According to him bail creates a huge barrier to justice for the poor. Among other problems, judges have a very different attitude to someone who shows up in prison garb versus someone who comes showered and suited, having been able to investigate their own case and even start working on the problem that got them into trouble in the first place (such as drug or alcohol use). The privatization of bail in the US has also created a huge financial industry that preys upon people not wealthy enough to raise the entire bail amount themselves. Some supposed solutions to the problem, such as profile-based risk assessment aren’t real improvements, according to John. And he explains why eliminating bail entirely isn’t a problem-free solution either. It’s a surprisingly interesting topic, and the discussion is thought provoking. On the positive side, there is a growing desire across the political spectrum to improve the situation.
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