The Infectious Myth On “The Infectious Myth” host David Crowe will examine the questionable or outright false paradigms that infect our society.

June 28, 2016  

David interviews Joel Savage on AIDS and Ebola, and the dark role of Belgium in African history. Although Joel has worked with Dr. Johan van Dongen on the theory that HIV and Ebola viruses are laboratory engineered, and David is skeptical of this theory, not accepting that there is any evidence the viruses exist, it is still an interesting discussion. Why are there still statues of King Leopold of Belgium who killed a similar number of Africans as Hitler killed Jews? And is the west really helping Africa when it comes to disease, or just using the perceived hopelessness for profit?

You can find out more about Joel’s work at: https://joelsavage1.wordpress.com

The book on AIDS and Ebola that Joel co-authored with Dr. van Dongen can be found at: https://www.amazon.com/Greatest-Medical-History-Against-Mankind-ebook/dp/B016W89W1G/

David also discusses the Orlando Pulse massacre and a recent Journal of the American Medical Association on trends in homicides and suicides, with and without guns, in Australia, before and after strict gun laws were enacted and enforced in 1996 and 1997: http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2530362

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June 21, 2016  

British author Alison Wolf (Baroness Wolf of Dulwich) discusses how our desire to give women equal opportunities at higher echelons of society has not helped their sisters at lower societal levels in her 2013 book, “The XX Factor". Is an emphasis on equal pay making women more satisfied with their life? Do the lives of elite women have more in common with men than with the majority of working women? Where have women’s lives improved, and where have they not? And, of course, what about the sex industry?

To find out more about Alison see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/management/people/academic/wolf.aspx

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June 14, 2016  

David interviews Steven Naifeh, and a Pullitzer Prize winner and co-author of a major biography of Vincent van Gogh, about the life of this artist. Vincent never achieved acceptance of either himself, or his art, during his life, even though now he is considered one of the superstars of the art world. There is a certain morbid fascination in examining a life that surely was miserable most of the time, yet produced some of the world’s most beautiful art. His personal problems included dysfunctional relationships with women, including his mother, and his few lovers, and also with his family, that kept him on an allowance, seemingly as long as he kept stayed far, far away. Even syphilis enters the picture and, of course, David doesn’t accept the infectious myth about that. You can find out more about Steven Naifeh and his biographies of van Gogh and Jackson Pollock at: http://stevennaifeh.com

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June 7, 2016  

David talks with Maurice Possley, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, about exonerations - the cases of people sentenced to a prison term, sometimes for life, sometimes for death, for a crime they didn’t commit. His work on this subject was influential in the decision of the governor of Illinois to commute the death sentences in his state, and also in the abolition of the death penalty there in 2011. Maurice Possley is the Senior Researcher for the National Registry of Exonerations and also writes for the Marshal Project. Read more about his work at: http://www.mauricepossley.com

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